Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts with the label cancer detection in dogs

3 Effective Treatments of Dog Cancer Hemangiosarcoma

By Dirk Vorderstra├če How Long Can a Dog Live with Hemangiosarcoma Currently there is no cure for the internal organ form of hemangiosarcoma.  However, dermal hemangiosarcoma may be effectively treated with removal of the tumor and a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the instance of hemangiosarcoma of the internal organs, many dogs will only survive a few days following diagnosis, due to hemorrhaging of the tumor. In instances of operable hemangiosarcoma tumors, dogs live an average of 89 days following surgery, with no other treatments or interventions. Dogs who receive chemotherapy following surgery, live and average of 180 days following surgery. Studies performed by University of Pennsylvania demonstrate that dogs receiving the Coriolus Versicolor mushroom extract produced by I’m Yunity, with no other treatment (i.e. no s urgery or chemotherapy), lived and average of 199 days, while some participants were still alive one year after the st

4 Promising Studies: Early Detection and Treatment Options for Canine Hemangiosarcoma

Courtesy of Public Domain Images Hemangiosarcoma is a form of cancer found almost exclusively in dogs. A relatively common canine cancer (6-8% of all canine cancers) it is estimated that 2 million of 73 million dogs currently alive in the United States will develop the disease and ultimately die from it. At this time, it is considered incurable, as it remains symptomless until the advanced stages of the disease.  The current standard of care, surgery and chemotherapy, have proven to extend the life to the affected dog a mere median of 180 days, with surgery alone, and an additionally 180 days with chemotherapy added to surgical intervention. In the wake of these poor treatment outcomes, research has focused on early detection of the disease as well as a new, very promising alternative medical approach. Hemangiosarcoma Hemangiosarcoma is an indolent cancer, meaning it initially develops very slowly, asymptomatically and painlessly.  The most common primary sites of the di