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3 Effective Treatments of Dog Cancer Hemangiosarcoma

By Dirk Vorderstra├če How Long Can a Dog Live with Hemangiosarcoma Currently there is no cure for the internal organ form of hemangiosarcoma.  However, dermal hemangiosarcoma may be effectively treated with removal of the tumor and a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the instance of hemangiosarcoma of the internal organs, many dogs will only survive a few days following diagnosis, due to hemorrhaging of the tumor. In instances of operable hemangiosarcoma tumors, dogs live an average of 89 days following surgery, with no other treatments or interventions. Dogs who receive chemotherapy following surgery, live and average of 180 days following surgery. Studies performed by University of Pennsylvania demonstrate that dogs receiving the Coriolus Versicolor mushroom extract produced by I’m Yunity, with no other treatment (i.e. no s urgery or chemotherapy), lived and average of 199 days, while some participants were still alive one year after the st

New Dog Cancer Cure: Targeted Chemo Hylaplat Gets Results

Photo Credit By cogdogblog  A New Therapy for Dogs With Metastic Cancers Is Now Available And Getting Good Results A new drug, HylaPlat, has produced high cure rates for many different forms of Canine Cancer. By way of targeting the cancer, and directly injecting it with Hylaplat chemotherapy, results have been dramatically improved locally, as well as systemically. So far the drug has proven highly effective on a variety of metastic cancers.  Trials are ongoing through veterinary practices, and your vet’s practice and your dog may be able to participate for free. Contact Information for canine cancer trial participation is located at the bottom of the article.

Breakthrough In Pain Treatment For Dogs With Osteosarcoma

Between 6000-8000 dogs in the United States receive treatment for Osteosarcoma each year.  Typically a disease of large breed dogs, Osteosarcoma can affect breeds of all sizes.  As the disease progresses, it reshapes normal healthy bone tissue and changes it to tumorous bone.  In dogs as in people, this remodeling process becomes increasingly more painful as the disease progresses, impacting activity levels and quality of life. Dr. Vladimir Osipov Sarcomaimages.com The Dorothy Cimino Brown, DVM and Kimberly Agnello DVM University of Pennsylvania Study Seventy dogs suffering from Osteosarcoma participated in this study.  A variety of breeds were represented including Rottweilers, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrieves and various mixed breeds. The average size of the dogs in the study was 90 pounds, and the average age fell between 8 and 9 years.  The study was conducted by splitting the group in half and treating both groups with standard care, while the second group also recei

4 Promising Studies: Early Detection and Treatment Options for Canine Hemangiosarcoma

Courtesy of Public Domain Images Hemangiosarcoma is a form of cancer found almost exclusively in dogs. A relatively common canine cancer (6-8% of all canine cancers) it is estimated that 2 million of 73 million dogs currently alive in the United States will develop the disease and ultimately die from it. At this time, it is considered incurable, as it remains symptomless until the advanced stages of the disease.  The current standard of care, surgery and chemotherapy, have proven to extend the life to the affected dog a mere median of 180 days, with surgery alone, and an additionally 180 days with chemotherapy added to surgical intervention. In the wake of these poor treatment outcomes, research has focused on early detection of the disease as well as a new, very promising alternative medical approach. Hemangiosarcoma Hemangiosarcoma is an indolent cancer, meaning it initially develops very slowly, asymptomatically and painlessly.  The most common primary sites of the di