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Showing posts with the label canine cancer

3 Effective Treatments of Dog Cancer Hemangiosarcoma

By Dirk Vorderstra├če How Long Can a Dog Live with Hemangiosarcoma Currently there is no cure for the internal organ form of hemangiosarcoma.  However, dermal hemangiosarcoma may be effectively treated with removal of the tumor and a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the instance of hemangiosarcoma of the internal organs, many dogs will only survive a few days following diagnosis, due to hemorrhaging of the tumor. In instances of operable hemangiosarcoma tumors, dogs live an average of 89 days following surgery, with no other treatments or interventions. Dogs who receive chemotherapy following surgery, live and average of 180 days following surgery. Studies performed by University of Pennsylvania demonstrate that dogs receiving the Coriolus Versicolor mushroom extract produced by I’m Yunity, with no other treatment (i.e. no s urgery or chemotherapy), lived and average of 199 days, while some participants were still alive one year after the st

New Dog Cancer Cure: Targeted Chemo Hylaplat Gets Results

Photo Credit By cogdogblog  A New Therapy for Dogs With Metastic Cancers Is Now Available And Getting Good Results A new drug, HylaPlat, has produced high cure rates for many different forms of Canine Cancer. By way of targeting the cancer, and directly injecting it with Hylaplat chemotherapy, results have been dramatically improved locally, as well as systemically. So far the drug has proven highly effective on a variety of metastic cancers.  Trials are ongoing through veterinary practices, and your vet’s practice and your dog may be able to participate for free. Contact Information for canine cancer trial participation is located at the bottom of the article.

Canine Cancer Resources

A diagnosis of cancer in your pet is devastating. However, the earlier it is detected, the better the prognosis for your companion. Researchers are now testing methods to improve early detection of cancers such as hemagiosarcoma and osteosarcoma.    While a comprehensive cancer screening program is still  far off in the future, it makes sense to learn the early warning signs of cancer, especially if your dog's breed is predisposed to one of these deadly canine cancers. Over the last three years, there has been an explosion of cancer treatment testing on dogs.  As dogs are larger than mice and closer to our body mass and their cancers are very similar to human's, canine cancer research on naturally occurring cancers benefits both species. Check out our listing of ongoing trials and their criteria below. Your pet may be eligible for one of the trials.  New advances in early detection and Traditional Chinese Medicine treatment protocols are extending dogs' lives, while off