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Showing posts with the label warning signs of cancer in dogs

3 Effective Treatments of Dog Cancer Hemangiosarcoma

By Dirk Vorderstra├če How Long Can a Dog Live with Hemangiosarcoma Currently there is no cure for the internal organ form of hemangiosarcoma.  However, dermal hemangiosarcoma may be effectively treated with removal of the tumor and a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the instance of hemangiosarcoma of the internal organs, many dogs will only survive a few days following diagnosis, due to hemorrhaging of the tumor. In instances of operable hemangiosarcoma tumors, dogs live an average of 89 days following surgery, with no other treatments or interventions. Dogs who receive chemotherapy following surgery, live and average of 180 days following surgery. Studies performed by University of Pennsylvania demonstrate that dogs receiving the Coriolus Versicolor mushroom extract produced by I’m Yunity, with no other treatment (i.e. no s urgery or chemotherapy), lived and average of 199 days, while some participants were still alive one year after the st

Osteosarcoma in Dogs: Diagnosis, Treatment and Outcomes

Great Dane and Chihuahua Skeletons Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons While Osteosarcoma represents just 5% of all canine tumors, it is estimated that between 6000 and 8000 new cases will be diagnosed this year in the United States. As the most common type of bone cancer in dogs, Osteosarcoma accounts for approximately 85% of canine tumors that originate in the skeletal system. This is an aggressive cancer where malignant tumors develop deep within the bone; from there they destroy healthy bone and remodel it with tumorous bone from the inside out.  The tumerous bone becomes increasingly painful and is not as strong as healthy bone, potentially causing the bone to break easily with minor injury. Risk Factors Associated With Development of Osteosarcoma In Dogs Osteosarcoma is generally a disease of large breed dogs, and although any size dog may develop the disease, it is estimated that large breeds such as the Scottish Deerhound are 200 times more likely to develop the disease

15 Warning Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Courtesy of PDPics.com Cancer is increasingly common in pet animals, and as pets age, the likelihood of contracting some form of the disease increases substantially.  In fact, cancer accounts for almost half of the deaths of pets over 10 years of age.  In breeds like the golden retriever it is estimated that between 60 and 80% will contract a form of cancer. But cancer is not restricted to geriatric canines, dogs as young as 4 years old may be diagnosed with it. While dogs in general contract cancer at approximately the same rate as humans; cats tend to get fewer cancers, perhaps owing to their nine lives. Some cancers such as Hemangiosarcom and Oesteosarcoma have a higher rate of occurrence within certain breeds, suggesting a genetic component is probably at work. If your dog’s breed has a propensity for developing a specific type of cancer, it is a good idea to familiarize yourself with the early warning symptoms of the onset of the disease.  Awareness of the signs